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OsuMarassa Consciousness

     Providing resources grounded in wholism, nature and African spirit-ritual traditions

Center for Evolutionary Spiritual Development

 

Giving Honor to Ma

Poetic libation to all my great mothers!

In the backyard of one of my ancestral homes sits a tiny house with two rooms. Two blood colored doors facing outwards to greet its makers. Not just any house but the house of the Marassa. Known elsewhere as the Ibeji, Geb and Nut, Castor and Pollux and other divine twins.

One room made of water, one made of fire. This house is the home of spiritual laws which governs the hands and our matrilineal lineage. This is the house of laws (or loas) which rules guiding principles of giving and receiving. The house of personal and community responsibility.

The house of protectors and magic healers. The house of dual maternity. Warriors and nurturers. Divinity of all dances. House of fertility, divine mothers doula and of duality.

When we remove the mysticism for the mundane, it is also the house of common sense approach to living in harmony with all life. The house of inner equanimity and outer harmony. The house of discernment. The house of creativity and destruction. The house of labor and birth. The house of balance.

Our house sits on a plot of land where cords are buried. Where our Captain's great tree still stands. Where Grand spirits still walk all hours of day and night.

That is where I come from on my mother side.

Tutu


Ayitian Vodou is referred to as Sèvis Gine" or "African Service" in Haiti.

We owe it to the next generation to form a bridge they can use to hold unto their heritage while adapting to changing times. Else they will be left behind.

Maman Cici

Record/Document of Enslaved Africans in Haiti
Vodou, primary culture and religion of millions in Haiti and throughout the Haitian diaspora. Haitian (Ayitian) Vodou is a creolized Vodoun with strong elements from Ibo, Kongo, Yoruba of Nigeria, and many other "nations" in the continent of Africa. Also influenced by the Taino, natives to the then known island of Hispaniola. These elements blended in the same way elements are being blended today from various cultures around the world in order to integrate a practice that meets the needs of our changing time. Make no mistakes, the concepts and spirituals do not change. How we represent these forces of nature and how we project them into our day to day changes... and always will. This is part of our responsibility to the next generation.  

Tutu